What do you do with your hands in walk? | Dressage Mastery TV Ep 296

What do you do with your hands in walk?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “What do you do with your hands in walk?”

So firstly, look at the horse’s head, and is the horse’s head moving in walk. Even if I don’t have a contact, does the horse’s head move in the walk? So if the horse’s head moves in walk, would that then make sense that our hands must also move in walk? Yes. So how do we figure that out?

There needs to be an element of moving with the horse’s body and the horses neck. How you do it is simply by having soft wrists. So many riders either have floppy wrists … sorry mate. But floppy wrists give a really loose contact, or fixed wrists, and you can see straight away my horse goes, “what’s that?”

 

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Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Hey riding superstars. Today, I’m going to answer the question, what do you do with your hands in walk?

Super, super, super question. So, let’s just go back to halt for a second. In the halt, I’m standing still, and my hands are still. Hands up, who can keep their hands still in halt? Yay. We are all winners. I used to just ride in halt, because I’d feel quite successful. The minute we started moving I had trouble, but in halt I could keep my body pretty good. Okay, so now they weren’t moving in halt. Now they’re moving in walk. So firstly, look at the horse’s head, and is the horse’s head moving in walk. Even if I don’t have a contact, does the horse’s head move in the walk? Yes. Thank you, Phil. Phil’s playing along for everyone at home. Thank you. So if the horse’s head moves in walk, would that then make sense that our hands must also move in walk? Yes. So how do we figure that out?

Because I remember learning that going, “Oh well I don’t want to be mean to the horse’s mouth so …” It’s okay, we’re not PR thing. Sorry, he’s just giving me different signals. We’re okay. No. So when we’re walking, yeah, I was so scared of touching his mouth so I’d be like, “Okay …” We’ll get back to the training in a second. I just wanted to remind you if you’re loving this video, make sure to subscribe and leave me a comment on how this video has helped and your biggest learning so far. I was like, “I don’t know. I can’t feel, I don’t know when I should give. I don’t know when I should take.” And then my coaches kept yelling at me, “Oh stop giving your hands away. Stop giving your hands away.” I was like, “Oh God.” But if I hold them, so then I’m not going to give my hands away. And I’d block them.

Can you see how I’m blocking them? I’m blocking them, I’m blocking them, I’m blocking them. And you can see what’s happened to the horse’s neck. It’s all jammed up and he’s like, “I don’t like you.” So there needs to be an element of moving with the horse’s body and the horses neck. How you do it is simply by having soft wrists. So many riders either have floppy wrists … sorry mate. But floppy wrists give a really loose contact, or fixed wrists, and you can see straight away my horse goes, “what’s that?” So you need to have soft, supple wrists that just go with the horse. And you can see I’m not … don’t ever think you can consciously do it, consciously, go, move, move, move, move, because that would do all our heads in. It has to be a feeling, has to be a feeling of I’m going to keep contact with the horse’s mouth. And that means that my hands move as he does.

Even if you close your eyes. Close your eyes and feel, I’m so scared, I’m about to go into a wall. Where are you going to take me, Olly?, But close your eyes. Have someone lead the horse. You’ll feel like you’re about to fall off as well, but get that feeling of being one with the horse. Your physiological body is getting so many cues through your legs, through your seat, through your body, through your hands. That feeling of going with the horse and being one with the horse is a really, really true thing. And the more you practice getting into your body and out of your head, the better your riding will be. So trust that helps, enjoy your walking. I’ll see you soon.

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