How Do You Do Sitting Trot? – Part 4: How To Use My Core For An Epic Trot?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “How Do You Do Sitting Trot? – Part 4: How do I use my core for an epic trot?”

This is the last part of a 4 part series on how to do sitting trot.

To watch Part 1: Using Your Seat Bones CLICK HERE
To watch Part 2: Sitting Still In The Trot CLICK HERE
To watch Part 3: Staying In the Saddle CLICK HERE

The final video in our series of how to do sitting trot is how to use our core.

Most of you know in sitting trot, it’s got something to do with my stomach, and something to do with your core, but don’t quite know what to do, so kind of leave that alone. Hands up, who does that?

So if you look back on the other videos in this series, we’ve got to plug in our seat bones, we’ve got to take the weight down through our ankle, and we have to use our inner groin muscles. The last key to the puzzle is we need to engage our core…

 

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Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Hey riding superstars. Today I’m going to answer the question how do you do sitting trot, part four.

Okay, so the last video in our series of how to trot epic is how to use our core. So most of you know in sitting trot, it’s got something to do, I knew it had something to with my stomach, and something to do with my core, but didn’t quite know what, didn’t know what to do, so kind of left that alone. Hands up, who does that? So if you look back on the other videos in these series, we have, we’ve got to plug in our seat bones, we’ve got to take the weight down through our ankle, and we have to use our inner groin muscles. The last key to the puzzle is we need to engage our core.

Now, we can engage our core, and have our stomach engaged in a million different ways. So one of the ways I always say is if I came at you with a big plank of wood, and whacked you in the stomach, what would you do? You’d do, “Uh, uh.” So if someone hits you, you can engage your core. Now if I dis and say I want to, if I disengage my core, you’re going to hurt me. I haven’t engaged those muscles, so as long as I engage my stomach, you can hit me, and it’ll almost bounce off because your muscles are engaged.

So it’s that kind of engagement, so while you’re sitting watching me right now, just engage, so relax your stomach and realize that that would hurt if you hit it. So then engage your stomach, which is literally just Pilates people call it pulling your belly button into your spine. I just call it that instinct, that if someone’s going to come and get me, I’m going to go, “Uh.” Just that uh feeling, okay? So it’s a pushing out, and so it’s not sucking in. It’s not, “Ooh, there’s a good looking guy. I’m really skinny, and I have no tummy.” It’s not sucking in. That’s the wrong thing. It’s engagement. It’s tensing that muscle. It’s creating, I call it a seat belt around. It’s not just your abs. It actually comes through all the way around your obliques, if I’m physiologically correct. It actually comes out in your back.

So if I’m actually going to tense my core, and engage my core, my back flares out as my entire core seat belt muscle. So that core has to be switched on. So, again, as you’re walking around, as I’m walking around doing the video, I’m not really engaged. Either is he. We’re all just having a lovely Sunday drive, but if I’m going to trot, especially sitting trot, I have to engage my core or I’m going to fall off. So if you’re learning this, and hands up whose done sitting trot. They’re like, “Oh, I have to stop because my stomach hurts.” That’s a good thing. So stomach, stomach, stomach, stomach, stomach. If you hit me right now in the belly, it wouldn’t hurt me. Well it depends how hard you hit, but my core’s engaged. Not at 100%. Not at, “Oh my God. I have to stop and pass out because,” it’s not the same as, you know, when you do an ab curl in the gym, or you do, it’s not even the same level engagement as when you do the bridge.

You know when you’re all, you can show a photo of what the bridge is. It’s not even that level of engagement, but it’s, so if you said the engagement on a bridge is like 70% of your core, I’d say riding, sitting trot is around 30 to 40% of your core. That’s how it can stay switched on and on for 10 hours if you were going to ride 10 horses. So, the answer to finding it and going, “Well I don’t know if I’m doing it correctly.” If it hurts you’re doing it correctly. Like if you get off and go, “Oh my abs are sore. I did five, 10, 15 minutes of sitting trot.” You did it good.

Remember, you don’t even have to go at like one minute. If you’re not doing sitting trot, one minute is plenty. So, I trust you enjoyed the series. Let us know if you have any feedback around it, and I’ll see you guys soon.

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