What you think about when you are riding a corner in dressage?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “What you need to think about when you are riding a corner in dressage?”

Sue is going to help me teach you guys, what do you need to do in a corner or what do you need to think about when you’re riding a corner in dressage.

But the fact is, even if you push with all your might with your inside leg, the horse can’t push its outside shoulder past the wall because the wall’s there. So the outside rein is important to control the shoulder. But the wall is also controlling the shoulder.

 

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To Your Success,

Natasha Althoff

Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Natasha:              Hi riding superstars. Today, I’m going to help you with the amazing Sue, thank you Sue.

Natasha:              Sue is going to help me teach you guys, what do you need to do in a corner or what do you need to think about when you’re riding a corner in dressage.

Natasha:              So, Sue, if you can, after A, just do a bad corner. If you know what a bad corner is.

Natasha:              Sue, that was kind of a good bad corner.

Sue:                       Sorry.

Natasha:              Or it was a bad, bad corner. She didn’t really stuff that up that much to help. Okay. But I’m guessing, to do a bad corner, what did you do between A and F?

Sue:                       I didn’t stay on the track, for a start.

Natasha:              Yep. One, you didn’t stay on the track.

Sue:                       And I wasn’t bent to… His body wasn’t on to the circle for a corner.

Natasha:              His body wasn’t bent, perfect.

Sue:                       Yup.

Natasha:              And what were you thinking about between A and F?

Sue:                       Not very much.

Natasha:              Perfect. Oh, Sue, it’s like we’ve rehearsed this. That was the answer I wanted. Not very much.

Natasha:              And what do you think 99.9% of dressage riders are thinking about in their corner?

Sue:                       Probably not very much.

Natasha:              Because when I was riding dressage, I liked the corner, because that meant I could do nothing, that was like my rest. Yeah, you’ve been there, done that.

Sue:                       Oh, definitely.

Natasha:              Cool. Okay. So, apparently it’s not a rest. Apparently it’s a very, very, very good opportunity to work on some things. So to do a good corner, especially in Australia, we have international judges come out and what do they always say when you go to clinics and stuff?

Sue:                       Use your corners.

Natasha:              Use your corners. Beautiful.

Natasha:              So absolutely. The arena is not, I don’t even know what kind of shape it would be, but we tend to cut our corners when we’re not riding a hundred percent of how we should be. One of the biggest things riders do is they cut their corners. And if they’re not cutting their corners, they’re at least not keeping the bend. And they’re also not thinking about their corners.

Natasha:              So the first thing is, so after A, from A to F, I want you to do a good corner. So that means I want you to ride into the corner.

Natasha:              Now do me a favor. Just walk and ride into the corner, so don’t cut the corner

Natasha:              And halt.

Natasha:              Okay, so horse dynamics explained. Horses can’t do… And just walk because I don’t want to get kicked. But the horse can’t go like this. Get to here, turn and do this. So they can’t go into the depths of the corner, but they absolutely can go deeper than we need them to go. The deeper we want to get them into the corner, what would be, do you think, the aid that you should apply to get them into the corner?

Sue:                       Inside leg. Outside rein.

Natasha:              Yeah.

Sue:                       But they need to be bent around your inside leg so that you can keep the body straight, but keep the bend through the ribs.

Natasha:              That’s it. So from A to F, I want you, and what you almost want to do is a little bit after A, I just want you to push with your inside leg and push them into the corner. Push into the corner. Push with your inside leg into the corner. Push with your inside leg into the corner. Perfect. That’s all you really need to do.

Natasha:              The outside rein, sure. If you didn’t have a corner, if you didn’t have a fence, you would need your outside rein a lot more. But the fact is, even if you push with all your might with your inside leg, the horse can’t push its outside shoulder past the wall because the wall’s there. So the outside rein is important to control the shoulder. But the wall is also controlling the shoulder. That’s why we cheat and do flying changes on the wall because we then don’t need to do it. So walls are amazing things. So if you have walls, you literally can in a corner, just push your inside leg on. Show us again.

Natasha:              Great. Beautiful. Good.

Natasha:              And it’s literally as easy as that. You don’t need to think anything more. You don’t need to do more. You don’t need to make it totally complicated. When you’re ready, trot. All you got to do is go, in every corner, I make sure that I push the horse into the corner.

Sue:                       Okay.

Natasha:              Good. So can you do me a crap one? Don’t push in with your inside leg. Just normal. Yep. So that’s a pretty shallow corner and now push him in.

Natasha:              Ah, good. And walk for a second. And I’m sure you can tell, especially if you’re a judge, what you’re going to think of this rider, if she did this corner as opposed she does this corner. It just shows you so much of the rider going, “Wow, they’re really thinking. Wow, they’re really using the corner. Wow. They’re really making sure that they get their horse prepared for the next movement.”

Natasha:              Plus when you’re doing a dressage test, if you’re preparing in your corner like that, you’re going to have a much better diagonal line than if you cut the corner. Because… Do you agree? If you cut the corner, how quick does the diagonal come up?

Sue:                       Very fast. Yeah, and then you’ve lost your bend and it just all gone.

Natasha:              Perfectly said, Sue. Awesome. All right, so you guys, happy corners and I’ll see you next time.

Natasha:              Today’s episode gave you huge value. I would love to invite you to a free class I’ve created for you to help you look and feel like a Grand Prix dressage rider in as little as three rides per week. Don’t worry if you don’t have a good enough horse. In secret number one, I’ll tell you why that doesn’t even matter. I’ll tell you how to do it in less than, in only three rides, and I’ll also tell you the secret you need to know to make sure you’re doing in your riding, to accelerate your results and get you to the next level. I can’t wait to have you in the class. It’s completely free. My gift to you. Click on the link to sign up.

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