What to do you do with your hands in trot? - Train with Tash

What to do you do with your hands in trot?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today, I am going to answer the question, “What to do you do with your hands in trot? ​”

I’m not a scientist. I don’t know if it does move slightly. But yeah, exactly. Not nearly as much in the walk. So that means your hands can be a lot stiller.

Let’s look at some sitting trot. Good. I know he’s got a very good sitting trot, so they’re not moving too much. Sometimes if you’re not secure in the sitting trot, they really bounce because you’re about to bounce off.

 

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To Your Success,

Natasha Althoff

Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

​Natasha :             Hi riding superstars. I will work on my diction. Welcome to part two of What To Do With Your Hands in the Hand Series. What do we do with our hands in trot?

Natasha :             When you’re ready, Anu, let’s trot. Okay. So the same deal as what we’re going through in the walk. Does the horse’s head move in trot?

Anu:                      Not as much.

Natasha :             Very good. I’m not a scientist. I don’t know if it does move slightly. But yeah, exactly. Not nearly as much in the walk. So that means your hands can be a lot stiller. But they still need to have feeling, they still need to go, “Is my horse … Right now you should feel resistance in your hand, because he’s got his head up and you want him to put his head down. Yes. Yeah. And then when you close your hands and you ride with your legs. Close your hand and ride with your legs. He drops the connection and then your hands should feel softer in the reigns. Do you feel that?

Anu:                      Yes. When he dropped..

Natasha :             Good. And when you talk to me or laugh with me, what do your hands do when you’re not focusing on them?

Anu:                      Oh, they are pouring the champagne.

Natasha :             They are pouring champagne all over him. Especially your inside reign likes to really drop. So just think about … I used to link my thumbs. Yeah. The horse’s head goes in the air. It’s awful for the horse, but it’s really good for you. I would link my thumbs and go, “I can’t literally do anything.” How could my hands be that close together? But then you figure it out. Yes. And you can ride the horse round while you have your thumbs linked, while you keep your hands together. Good.

Natasha :             We’ll get back to the training in a second. I just wanted to remind you, if you’re loving this video, make sure to subscribe and leave me a comment on how this video has helped and your biggest learning so far.

Natasha :             Yeah. And doing a really great job. While she’s going up and down with her body, her hands are moving slightly. So I’ve made a good job because they’re not moving heaps. Can you keep your hands even stiller? As your body goes up, don’t let your hands go up at all. Keep them stiller. Grab some mane. Yeah. Do you feel that that level of, “Whoa, they’re not moving.”

Anu:                      Yeah, now they aren’t walking.

Natasha :             Yeah, they’re not moving. Great. So now let go of the mane, but keep that. Ah, much better. Feel the difference?

Anu:                      Yeah.

Natasha :             Yeah. So that’s a cool exercise you can do. You can grab the mane, because I used to do that and go, “Whoa.” That’s how it’s meant to feel. How am I ever going to do that? And it’s just a muscle memory. Now that I’ve talked again, what’s Anu’s hands doing? They’re moving again. Grab the mane. Yes. Now let go of the mane. Stomach. Yes. Good job. So in the trot, you’ve got to make sure that your hands stay still, even though you’re going up and down.

Natasha :             Let’s look at some sitting trot. Good. I know he’s got a very good sitting trot, so they’re not moving too much. Sometimes if you’re not secure in the sitting trot, they really bounce because you’re about to bounce off. I would say your hands don’t move as much in the sitting. Do you know why I would say that? Why would they not move so much? What do you have to do in sitting that you don’t necessarily have to do in rising?

Anu:                      Use my core.

Natasha :             Yes. So what does that now tell you about your rising? Go back to rising and use the same amount of core. Yes. And look at her hands. So just walk for a second. So when people go, “Oh, I want to keep my hands still. I want to keep my hands still.” Sometimes, yes, hold the mane and it’s a muscle memory from your arms or your biceps or your wrist. But sometimes it’s … So that’s why I took her into sitting trot and I went, “Oh, actually her body knows what she needs to do. She’s just not working what she needs to work.” So sometimes it’s a core issue or sometimes it’s a back strength issue, or whatever it is. So yeah, trust that helps. Any questions?

Anu:                      No.

Natasha :             No. All right.

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