How do I keep my leg still and stable in the trot?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “How do I keep my leg still and stable in the trot?”

The first step to keeping your legs still and stable in the trot – take away the stirrups!! The slower the trot the easier it will be for you 🙂
I want you to make sure you are gripping with your upper groin/thigh muscles rather than using the stronger muscles on the back of your leg and letting your toes turn out.

Most people try and grip by turning their toes out a little bit and using the back of their thigh, because it’s a bit of a stronger muscle.

 

If you enjoyed today’s episode and it gave you huge value, I would love to invite you to a free class I’ve created for you to help you look and feel like a Grand Prix dressage rider in as little as three rides per week.

Don’t worry if you don’t have good enough horse – in secret number one, I’ll tell you why that doesn’t even matter.

I’ll tell you how to do it in only three rides per week, and I’ll also tell you the secret you need to know to make sure you’re doing in your riding to accelerate your results and get you to the next level. I can’t wait to have you in the class. It’s completely free. My gift to you, click on the button below to sign up now.

I’d love to hear from you how you go and what strategies you use to get your horse to canter.

Offer as much details as possible in your reply – your story might just help someone else have a breakthrough in their riding journey!

Important: Links to other posts, videos etc. will be removed.

Thank so so much for reading, watching and sharing your story!

To Your Success,

Natasha Althoff

Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Natasha: Hey riding superstars! Welcome to Train with Tash TV. Today I’m going to answer the question, “How do I keep my legs still and stable in the trot?”

Natasha: Okay, so have you done any work with no stirrups before?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yes? Okay. Do you like work with no stirrups?

Student: No. Does anybody though?

Natasha: Sorry?

Student: Does anybody like no stirrups?

Natasha: They’re sick people.

Natasha: Have you done rising trot with no stirrups?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah? Cool. Okay. So what do you think, if you were to be psychic, what do you think the very next thing I’m going to ask you to do is?

Student: Take my stirrups out?

Natasha: Yes. Thank you. You get to graduate from psychic school.

Natasha: Cool. Okay, and what we’re going to do is some rising trot, no stirrups. You can keep the trot as slow as you want, I don’t know if you’ve figured out by now the slower the trot the easier?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah. So if he starts off, I mean it’s all right, he probably won’t, but if he went [inaudible 00:01:13] big trot. Just slow it down, make it as easy as possible. You’re not going to rise very high, which is fine, but you are going to have to rise. And I just want you to focus on touching your toes underneath his belly.

Student: Okay.

Natasha: Okay? So most people try and grip by turning their toes out a little bit and using the back of their thigh, because it’s a bit of a stronger muscle. I want you to just pick up your thighs, even in the walk, just pick it up and roll it in like that.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Student: That feels weird.

Natasha: And it should, yeah, that’s a much better leg position, and it should hurt. Like you kind of want to cry a little bit.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Do you want to cry a little bit?

Student: Little bit.

Natasha: All right, so when you’re ready, rising trot.

Student: Ow. Hang on.

Natasha: Okay. Try that again.

Natasha: Good, but where’s our toes gone? Yeah, so bring that in, roll it in, that’s it. Good.

Natasha: And do you know your diagonals?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Good.

Natasha: Keep the trot. Yeah. Good. Take care of your hands, roll your shoulders back, look up. Keep your stomach tight. Where’s our legs? Yeah! Good!

Natasha: Ah, where’s your leg? Yes. Good. You got two more circles in you?

Student: No.

Natasha: Come on, dig.

Student: One more.

Natasha: No, no, no, you’re doing good. Only got one and a half more to go. You can do this. Good, turn your toes in. Yes! Yeah, nearly there. You’ve nearly only got one more circle to go. Quarter of a circle. Turn your toes in. Yeah, and now only one more circle to go. Come on it’s just one more circle.

Natasha: Toes in, toes in, toes in. Good. Good. Toes in, toes in, toes in. Yes. Yes. Half circle to go. Half circle to go, toes in. Half circle to go, toes in. Yep, I know, I know, you’ve got this. You’ve got this. Quarter of a circle. Quarter of a circle. Quarter of a circle. Five, four, three, two, one, walk.

Natasha: Good, toes in. Relax, but toes in. Cool, what’s hurting?

Student: My thighs.

Natasha: Yep, where in your thighs?

Student: Inside.

Natasha: Yeah, good. So this is in answer to a video that I did, which was “How do you keep a steady stable lower leg?”

Natasha: And the key is, by really growing and having that your upper thighs and upper groin muscles can keep you in the saddle. And the best way to train it is also rising trot no stirrups, because that really, you’re going to fall off unless you stabilize somehow.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Now, did you feel the pain intensified when you had to turn your toes in?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yes. Which made you then do what?

Student: Turn them out.

Natasha: And you’re remarkable. I haven’t seen a rider with so much flexibility. Normally this is like toes out, and this is toes in, but you’re really quite pronounced with your toes out. You’re actually really quite pronounced with your toes in as well.

Student: Yeah, I saw a physio and they said I have like hyper-mobility or something.

Natasha: Cool!

Student: So…

Natasha: Yeah.

Student: They’re like, “That’s not normal.”

Natasha: Take it. Whatever super powers you were born with, take them.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: That’s awesome, and all you got to remember is to use your superpowers… Because your advantaged and disadvantaged. Because you’ve got that great movement, you can keep your legs where you need to.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: A lot of people find that hard. But also when you relax and don’t keep your legs where you need to, they’re really wrong. So do you get, if I put spurs on, like I could never put spurs on you?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Because your legs would just be…

Student: My legs keep turning out.

Natasha: Yeah. So the only, you know, people go, “When am I ready for spurs? When I train novice? Or when my horse…”

Natasha: I’m like, “You can wear spurs on a three year old, as long as your leg stays flat to the horse’s side, and doesn’t sit like that.”

Natasha: So, and the reason why we, as I said, we turn our legs out, is because that’s stronger than this.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Okay. Change the reign, we’re going to do five on the other side.

Natasha: Now, do you have a horse at home?

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah, great. So, is your horse quiet?

Student: Yeah, pretty quiet. She’s just really forward. So she’s not like naughty.

Natasha: Yeah, okay, so you want to work on… That’s great that they’re forward, you do want something that’s forward. You just want to work on your control, and then you want to make it as quick as possible for horses. For riders that have quiet horses, to make a commitment, I will do five circles each side before I start my session.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: So that’s ten circles, rising trot, no stirrups. As long as your horse is safe, as long as it’s quiet, as long as it’s a safe situation. That’s going to help you advance a lot quicker than shying away from them.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah? Okay. So when you’re ready, trot. And let’s get that toe in. Toes in. Yeah, so toes in first, don’t worry about the trot. Toes in, toes in, toes in. More. Yes.

Student: This one isn’t as good because I broke it.

Natasha: Yeah, I was going to say…

Student: I broke my ankle in December.

Natasha: Probably the camera, the camera should have stayed where my eyesight is, because the camera’s picking up your other foot now going, “Oh yeah, she is good.”

Natasha: Okay, so I’m going to then be yelling at you more, because I can see this leg.

Student: Yeah.

Natasha: Okay, so when you’re ready, trot. Use the whip if you need to. Now, I ask to trot now.

Natasha: That’s right. Yeah, make your circle 20 meters, make him stay out on the track. Yeah, now toes in and rise.

Natasha: Are you on the correct diagonal?

Student: No.

Natasha: Good. Come on, toes in. What’s that toe doing? Yes. Yeah.

Natasha: Yeah, just go, “I got to touch my toes under his belly.”

Natasha: What if I had a million dollars in my hands, going “It’s yours, just touch your toes.”

Natasha: Touch your toes under his belly. Come on, turn it in, turn it in, touch your toes.

Natasha: Got a million dollars here, I want to give it to you, you just got to touch your toes under his belly. Turn them in, turn them in. This one does not want to turn in.

Student: No it’s really bad.

Natasha: Turn it in. Turn it in. Come on. For a million dollars. Yes, there’s your money shot. I know you can only keep it for two strides, that’s okay. Then go, I’m going to kick it up to three!

Natasha: One, two, three! Then have a little break, And then one, two, three! And have a little break.

Natasha: No, no, no, I didn’t say trot. Trot. Trot. Trot. Your break is you can turn it out for a second, and then turn it back in.

Natasha: Yeah, rise. Good, toe in. Come on, dig. This is how champions are made. Come on. That’s it. Good job. Good job. Come on, rise. Yeah. Rise and toe in. Rise and toe in. Rise and toe in. Come on, that’s it! Two more circles now. Make them the best two circles you’ve ever done.

Natasha: Keep him out on the circle, turn your toe in, touch your toes and rise. Why are you sitting? Ah, you just gained yourself another circle.

Student: Oh man.

Natasha: Good, toe in. Toe in. Yes. Come on, rise. Rise. Rise. Now you’ve got two circles. Come on. Dig, toe in. Dig. Dig. Dig. When you think you’re done, you’re only 40% done. More. Yeah, toe in, toe in, toe in, toe in, toe in, toe in, toe in. Rise. That’s it.

Natasha: One more circle, come on. Toe in, toe in. Come on, don’t let me say it for one whole circle. Toe in, toe in, toe in, toe in. That’s it. Rise.

Student: I’m losing my balance.

Natasha: Rise. Come on, dig. You got half a circle, we don’t give up! Come on, rise! Toe! Rise! Toe! Rise! Toe! Rise! Toe!

Natasha: Now rest. Good. Good job. Close time for a sec. Okay, any questions. Keep him walking, keep him out on the 20 meter circle, don’t let him fall in.

Student: No.

Natasha: No questions? Cool. Okay. Thank you very much for showing everyone at home how it’s done. Good digging. How you feeling?

Student: Tired.

Natasha: Tired? Good.

Natasha: Today’s episode gave you huge value, I would love to invite you to a free class I’ve created for you, to help you look and feel like a Grand Prix Dressage rider in as little as three rides per week.

Natasha: Don’t worry if you don’t have a good enough horse, in secret number one I’ll tell you why that doesn’t even matter. I’ll tell you how to do it in less than in only three rides, and I’ll also tell you the secret you need to know to make sure you’re doing in your riding to accelerate your results and get you to the next level.

Natasha: I can’t wait to have you in the class, it’s completely free. My gift to you, click on the link to sign up.

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