How to leg yield without the hindquarters lagging behind? | Dressage Mastery TV Ep 306

How to leg yield without the hindquarters lagging behind?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “How to leg yield without the hindquarters lagging behind?”

Now if you’re teaching leg yielding for the very, very, very first time and your horse doesn’t even know how to move sideways, the fact that it moves sideways with any part of its body is yay. But once you have taught to move off the leg, you really want to make sure that you see front legs and hind legs together. And the best way to make sure you do that is half halt and block the opposite shoulder.

When you’re leg yielding you want to see only two legs, the front legs and the hind legs together. So there are two ways to do that. You’ve got to ask for the leg yield with the proper leg.

 

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Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

​​Okay. So when people are learning to leg yield, their leg yield can look a little like this. Who’s had that? I’m leg yielding. Sorry, I’m just trying to do it badly. I’m leg yielding. I’m leg yielding. I’m leg yielding. I’m leg yielding. I’m leg yielding. And the hind legs are trailing. So when you’re leg yielding you want to see only two legs, the front legs and the hind legs together. So there’s two ways to do that. Obviously, firstly, you’ve got to ask for the leg yield with the proper leg. But what happens is when you use this leg to push the horse that way, what tends to happen? The horse goes that way and they like to lead with their shoulders. So they do this. So you can see he’s getting to the wall with his shoulders, but his hind legs are lagging behind.

Now if you’re teaching leg yielding for the very, very, very first time and your horse doesn’t even know how to move sideways, the fact that it moves sideways with any part of its body is yay. But once you have taught to move off the leg, you really want to make sure that you see front legs and hind legs together. And the best way to make sure you do that is half halt and block the opposite shoulder. So when I’m going to leg yield, right, I’m going to half halt, I’m going to use my right leg and I’m going to half halt with my left outside rein, my left rein to stop the shoulder from running to the fence. You all right if I commence?

Yes.

Poor Phil’s running around. Okay, so here’s my right leg. And you see straight away he wants to block the shoulder. So I almost pushed the shoulder over to the right and still asked with my right leg. And every now and then he wants to throw his body that way. And it takes a lot of my concentration to send his shoulders to the right. Yes, but send his hind legs to the left. And if you do that, you’ll normally get a quite nice straight leg yield. Now the reason the leg yield is there is because the judge wants to see, do you have control over all parts of the horse? Not just the hind legs, not just the shoulders. Both parts. Do you want to do a poo? Let’s do that for the video hey.

All the way backwards.

All right, so again, leg yield. Let me just show you without blocking the shoulder straight away, the hind legs are trialing. Sorry, half halt, left. Send the left shoulder over to the right and you can say, I can make it that behind like lead if I really want to. If I really blocked the shoulder, I can make the hind legs lead. Now obviously I don’t want the hind legs to lead, so just let the shoulders go. Just that little bit and it really is that balance. Now let me go this way. And straight away he wanted to throw the shoulder. So I’m just keeping him between my leg and my hand. And the horse will change. Like he goes almost trialing to throwing the shoulder. Almost trialing, throwing the shoulder. Now we’ve got our hind legs leading. Now we’re straight. Now we’re straight. Now our hind legs are leading. Now we’re straight. Now they’re trialing, now they’re straight. Yeah. Uh-uh (negative). Uh-uh (negative). Uh-uh (negative).

And you can see sometimes I just put my inside leg on and I’ll make him yield the other way. If he’s really throwing the shoulders to the one direction or the other, I’ll make him go back to say, “Hey, don’t run through my shoulder rights. I need you to stay right between my shoulders and my legs.” And there he’s staying. Now I’m going to go back. There he’s a bit blocked. Whoops. Whoops. So he throw himself. So I’m going to go back this way, back this way, back this way, back this way. And then back over here. Uh-uh-uh, don’t throw your body, just stay. And if you keep training the horse like that, they really let you in and be able to control the front bit, the back bit, the middle bit, and all the bits in between. Good boy. So have fun and play with that and I’ll see you on the other side.

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