How to get the inside leg to outside rein connection and what should you be working on?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “How to get the inside leg to outside rein connection and what should you be working on?”

Basically it means that you’ve got the horse, so if I ride the horse completely straight, here he is straight, and then I ride a hugely exaggerated inside rein to outside rein or inside leg to outside rein, which is actually a shoulder in, what I do when I ride that correctly, you can see he slowed down for a second. What that means is I’m bringing that inside hind leg closer to his front legs and more under his body, which means I’m collecting him, which means he has to work harder, which is why he slowed down to begin with.

That’s why the inside leg to outside rein is so important to master. How do you do it? You practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and the nuances of how you do it will get better.

 

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Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Hey riding superstars! Today I’m going to answer how do you develop that inside leg to outside reign connection why is it important and what should you be doing and working on when you’re thinking about inside leg to outside rein.

Okay, so the inside to outside rein connection, we all talk about it, inside rein to outside rein but what does it mean? Basically it means that you’ve got the horse, so if I ride the horse completely straight, here he is straight, and then I ride a hugely exaggerated inside rein to outside rein or inside leg to outside rein, which is actually a shoulder in, what I do when I ride that correctly, you can see he slowed down for a second. What that means is I’m bringing that inside hind leg closer to his front legs and more under his body, which means I’m collecting him, which means he has to work harder, which is why he slowed down to begin with to go, ooh hang on, that’s a bit hard.

Again, shoulder in, it’s a huge exaggeration. Now I’m going to straight again and you see the minute I went straight, what did he do? He went faster again. Now that’s not ideal. That’s not what’s meant to happen but that’s if I’m not riding and not actually riding the rhythm. That’s what the rhythm naturally does because the position I’m putting the horse in with his body, this brings him more collected, more together, which means the rhythm slows down and it shouldn’t. If I wasn’t talking to you and I was focusing on my shoulder in, I would ride it more forward and then as I straighten him out, he will naturally want to go faster and I okay the rhythm with my seat.

That’s why the inside leg to outside rein is so important to master. How do you do it? You practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and you practice and the nuances of how you do it will get better and better and better and better and better. Please don’t think I’ve arrived. I’m still learning inside leg to outside rein. I listen to Isabelle Worth talk about it and I go, I know I don’t have it. I know I don’t have it how she had it because look at how her horses go, so that’s fine. You know, we’re all in our riding journey, wherever we are on our riding journey.

Basically what you want to think of is my inside leg controls the ribs of the horse. You’ve got the the horse here and so when you put your inside leg on, you want to move that rib cage over here. Like if I wiggle you here, you’re going to go like this, so you might not actually move. I haven’t taken a step over there because I’d fall off the horse, but I’ve moved my rib cage and that creates a beautiful little bend and with my weight gone, it’s gone more into that outside shoulder. Which means I’ve created this nice little banana bend and I’ve got more weight on my outside shoulder, and therefore I’m set up if I was going to do a shoulder in or a half pass or anything like that.

That ability to be able to do this and do this, you’ve got to be able to do it on both sides, is going to give you more control over the horse’s body and when you have more control over the horse’s body, you can influence how it goes, where it goes and where it goes. How, why, when, all those things. All I want you to think about is even when you’re walking around go okay, my horse is straight. I’m not riding inside leg to outside rein. I just have 50% of my weight in my reins and 50% of weight in my legs. Now I’m going to put my inside leg on and the minute you put your inside leg on, I need you to take a little bit more on the outside rein. Good boy.

You can see straight away what’s happened. Now I haven’t asked for shoulder in, just asked him to give me a little bit and there he pushed against it. Did you see he pushed his body into my inside leg? They do that. That’s all right, keep going with it. If you’re having problems with getting your horse on the bit, problems with rhythm, all those kinds of things, when you do that exercise, you’ll notice things to change or notice the horse starts to slow down. You’ll notice the horse gets rounder and more connected, which is what you’re looking to achieve, so play, play, play, play, play. Good luck with it and let me know how you go in the comments.

Tell us if that helps. Remember, if you guys need any help with steps, procedures, strategies, recipes, how do you do A, how do you do B, how do you do C, I’ve got a free training class that tells you all about creating a dressage system that works for you. Go check it out on the link below.

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