What do you do with your hands in trot? | Dressage Mastery TV Ep 297

What do you do with your hands in trot?

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today’s question is, “What do you do with your hands in trot?”

So obviously the answer to keeping your hand still, what should I do with my hands in trot? Keep them out in front of you. I always think that I’ve got them in a glass rectangular box. So they can’t split away from each other.

You’ve got to practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. Because when you’re trotting, it’s all about the independent feet and independent hands.

 

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Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Hey, riding superstars. Today I’m going to answer the question, what should you do with your hands in trot?

Super Super Super question because ideally you want your hands to remain in the same spot, but if you are in rising trot, I can’t do rising trot very well in walk, but you would think, okay, if my hand position stays here… Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa… And I go up, then my hands are going to come up with my rise. I know no one ever actually rises like this, but go with it. So, you’re going to have to tell your hands to stay still when you go up, which is… It’s technical.

So that’s the first thing, if you’re in a rising trot, if you’re in sitting trot, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce, and you’re going to try and keep your balance with your hands. It’s normal. So that’s what you’re up again. So obviously the answer to keeping your hand still, what should I do with my hands in trot? Keep them out in front of you. I always think that I’ve got them in a glass rectangular box. So they can’t split away from each other. One can’t go up, one can’t go down or this way, or that they start coming up to here. I’ve got a glass box that my two hands fit into and no matter what happens, they don’t move. So if I have to pull back, I can pull back there or if I give, I can give there. But it all happens within this box.

We’ll get back to the training in a second. I just wanted to remind you if you’re loving this video, make sure to subscribe and leave me a comment on how this video has helped, and your biggest learning so far.

So, that’s what you need to do. How do you do it? That’s the question. You’ve got to practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. Because when you’re trotting, it’s all about the independent feet and independent hands. So, if you’re trotting, obviously my body’s moving, have a look at my legs moving because that’s my shock absorber because the horse is throwing me around. And my hands are only moving ever so slightly with the horse’s body. Hello. But they’re not bouncing with my bounce. Okay? The bounce goes in my body and my hands just stay out in front of me.

Or even if I’m rising, my hands stay in exactly the same position, then, regardless of what my body’s doing. So that answers the question of where your hands should be and what they should be doing. In order to do it though, just practice. It’s okay that you’re learning. It’s okay that, like, I used to sit there and go and every coach says, “Look up, look up.” But I just used to stare at my hands because I would trot and my hands would do this. They’d just do independent things, and I’d be like, “I didn’t even tell my hands to do that.” It took forever to understand that my hands were independent and separated from my body, and they could do different things while my body did other different things. So keep practicing, keep enjoying and I’ll see you soon.

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