How to correctly hold the double rein - Train with Tash 2nd of January

How to correctly hold the double rein

Hey Dressage Superstars! Today, I am going to answer the question, “How to correctly hold the double rein?”

Ride shoulder in from the very first stride. You have the skills, you have the ability. The horse has the skills, the horse has the ability. Now it’s just a mindset thing of commitment. Good. I can already tell you’ve got it because I can see your brain change. Good. Go. Three. Three legs. Three legs. Yeah huh, much better. Then once you’ve got the three legs nailed play with the rhythm, make sure he’s going, play with the roundness but don’t let that affect your three legs.

Like if it gets too deep or something then sometimes you can reverse the action of the curb, so then when you use it it’ll put the horse’s head up rather than put the horse’s head down. But most horses need to put their head down, so it’s there.

 

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To Your Success,

Natasha Althoff

Full Transcript Expand to full transcript

Natasha Althoff:               Okay, so we have Anu from Finland who, can I just say it, she’s a masseuse. I was thinking that like … Sorry, do you get why I’m so thrilled by that?

Anu:                                      No. No, I don’t.

Natasha Althoff:               But then it was my stupid mind, because Phil’s going, “Why are you keeping going on that she’s a Finnish masseuse? That she’s a Finnish masseuse?” I’m like, “Because that’s the stereotype.” He said, “No that’s a Swedish masseuse.”

Anu:                                      Yeah it is.

Natasha Althoff:               I’m like, “Oh it so is,” so I’ll shut up about that.

Natasha Althoff:               But Anu is my new favorite person. She is smart, she is amazing with the horses. She thinks. You have no idea how rare that is. So totally in love with her. She is going to … She’s never ridden a horse with a double bridle, so we thought we would put her on Mini, appropriately named, to help her and to help you guys understand what you should do if you’re riding in a double for the first time.

Natasha Althoff:               So Anu has done this perfectly. What I told her was to start with we need to make sure that she can keep each rein independent. So I’ve told her to put a big old loop in the curb, so it’s as if she … The curb’s not there. She’s not touching it, she’s not riding on it, and she’s keeping her hands closed on the snaffle. Now if we just halt up near Kate.

Natasha Althoff:               We’ll get back to the training in a second. I just wanted to remind you if you’re loving this video make sure to subscribe, and leave me a comment on how this video has helped, and your biggest learning so far.

Natasha Althoff:               Cool. If you’ve never ridden in a double before how did you know to do that with your hands? Just show the-

Anu:                                      Oh I do the same with the-

Natasha Althoff:               … can you see … Sorry. Can you see on the camera?

Kate:                                     Yeah, yeah.

Natasha Althoff:               [crosstalk] Yeah. Cool. Yeah.

Anu:                                      I do the same with the draw reins.

Natasha Althoff:               Yes, perfect. Yep. So what we do is whenever we pick up a snaffle we always put the snaffle between the ring finger and the end finger. So no matter if you’re riding … I don’t know if there’s ever a thing called a triple bridle, but if there was you would still … Same signs. Snaffle goes where it always has. That means you’ve got to hae a different rein for the curb, which is normally always this one.

Natasha Althoff:               There is other … Have you seen other ones? They’re really weird. They come up through here.

Anu:                                      Oh no, haven’t seen them.

Natasha Althoff:               Yeah but I couldn’t get it. No.

Anu:                                      Yeah.

Natasha Althoff:               It’s for a particular type of horse that does a particular type of … Like if it gets too deep or something then sometimes you can reverse the action of the curb, so then when you use it it’ll put the horse’s head up rather than put the horse’s head down. But most horses need to put their head down, so it’s there.

Natasha Althoff:               For now we’re just going to trot, and canter, and warmup without using them. Then we’re going to talk about using them a little bit.

Natasha Althoff:               Go down the arena again. Ride shoulder in from the very first stride. You have the skills, you have the ability. The horse has the skills, the horse has the ability. Now it’s just a mindset thing of commitment. Good. I can already tell you’ve got it because I can see your brain change. Good. Go. Three. Three legs. Three legs. Yeah huh, much better. Then once you’ve got the three legs nailed play with the rhythm, make sure he’s going, play with the roundness but don’t let that affect your three legs. Yeah.

Natasha Althoff:               Okay. Now I just want to bring attention to our reins. How do you think you’ve gone holding both the reins?

Anu:                                      Yeah, they are shorting.

Natasha Althoff:               They’re not too short yet, but isn’t it hilarious they are shortening?

Anu:                                      Yeah.

Natasha Althoff:               As I told you before, and anyone who tries to ride in a double for the first time, it’s magic.

Anu:                                      Yeah, it just happens.

Natasha Althoff:               Double bridles are magical and by no account of your own the curb shortens.

Natasha Althoff:               So trust that helps. Remember if you guys need any help with steps, procedures, strategies, recipes, how do you do A, how do you do B, how do you do C, I’ve got a free training class that tells you all about creating a dressage system that works for you. Go check it out on the link below.

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